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NVTC Hosts Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference

On May 5, the NVTC Big Data and Analytics Committee, in partnership with the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority and Inova Center for Personalized Health (ICPH), hosted the Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference to highlight innovations in personalized health leveraging Big Data. The event, which was held at the new Inova Center for Personalized Health campus, covered the convergence of health and technology, as well as the opportunities for companies in our region, and featured keynote addresses and panels from both fields.

NVTC Chair Todd Stottlemyer, CEO of the ICPH, opened up the event by discussing Inova’s vision for personalized health, which heavily depends on big data and technology as enabling functions. According to Stottlemyer, predictive prevention, individualized wellness and personalized medicine are key components of ICPH’s Vision 2020. Stottlemyer also shared plans for the ICPH campus and outlined potential future partnerships. In addition, Jerry Gordon, president and CEO of the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority who served as the event’s emcee, also provided opening remarks focusing on the importance of this field for the region.

Todd Stottlemyer, NVTC Chair and CEO of the Inova Center for Personalized Health.
Todd Stottlemyer, CEO of the Inova Center for Personalized Health (ICPH), kicked off the NVTC Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference at the ICPH campus on May 5.

The event’s first keynote address was given by Dr. Shahram Ebadollahi, vice president of innovations and chief science officer of the IBM Watson Health Group. Ebadollahi shared how data can be aggregated, accessed and curated to provide medical insights at scale. He also discussed challenges involving compliance, security and privacy.

 Dr. Shahram Ebadollahi.
Dr. Shahram Ebadollahi, vice president of innovations and chief science officer of the IBM Watson Health Group gave the first keynote address of the Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference.

David A. Dworaczyk, Ph.D. , director of life and health sciences strategic development at Oracle, also gave keynote remarks. Dworaczyk discussed how precision medicine can improve outcomes and lower costs in health care. He also highlighted the challenge of extracting meaningful and actionable information from data, warning against being “being data rich, but information poor.”

David A. Dworaczyk, Ph.D., director of life and health sciences strategic development at Oracle.
David A. Dworaczyk, Ph.D., director of life and health sciences strategic development at Oracle, was the third keynote speaker at the NVTC Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference.

Finally, Christopher Barrett, director of the Virginia Biocomplexity Institute at Virginia Tech, shared how his team is utilizing data analytics and information biology approach to analyze, predict, explain and visualize the behavior of complex systems. The Institute is working with cutting-edge tools and databases to advance understanding of immunology, high-performance computing architecture, bacterial genomes and more.

Christopher Barrett, director of the Virginia Biocomplexity Institute at Virginia Tech.
Christopher Barrett, director of the Virginia Biocomplexity Institute at Virginia Tech, was the final keynote speaker at the Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference.

The event also featured two panels. The Genomics Panel was moderated by Aaron Black, director of Informatics at the Inova Translational Medicine Institute, and consisted of Dr. David Delaney, chief medical officer of SAP; Steve Halliwell, U.S. director of healthcare and life sciences, Amazon Web Services; Crystal R. Icenhour, Ph.D., CEO of Aperiomics; and Dr. Emanuel F. Petricoin, co-director of Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine (CAPMM) at George Mason University. The panel discussed the opportunities involved in the genomics sector while also discussing some of the challenges, such as security, storage and transmitting large amounts of data. According to the panel, innovation and collaboration are essential for genomics, with several panelists highlighting the importance of university research and training programs to growth in the field.

 The Genomics Panel during the Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference.
The Genomics Panel during the Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference. From left: Crystal R. Icenhour of Aperiomics, Steve Halliwell of Amazon Web Services, Dr. Emanuel F. Petricoin of George Mason University and Dr. David Delaney of SAP.

The second panel focused on Digital Health, featuring Mike Baird, CEO of Avizia; Paul Clark, director of healthcare research at Digital Reasoning Systems Inc.; John Lettow, CEO of Vorbeck Materials; Dr. Randall Moorman, professor of medicine, Biomedical Engineering and Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics at the University of Virginia; and Jonathon Perrelli, CEO of LifeFuels. The panel, which was moderated by Innovation Health Chief Medical Officer Sunil Budhrani, discussed how tech entrepreneurs are focused on innovation, and emphasized that building relationships with physicians will improve health care tools. The panel also touched on how the Inova Center for Personalized Health will provide a collaborative environment for tech community and healthcare providers, an offering that Perelli and Lettow are excited about.

The Digital Health Panel at the Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference.
The Digital Health Panel at the Health Care Informatics & Analytis Conference. From left: John Lettow of Vorbeck Materials, Jonathon Perrelli of LifeFuels, Mike Baird of Avizia, Paul Clark of Digital Reasoning Systems Inc., Dr. Randall Moorman of the University of Virginia and moderator Sunil Budhrani of Innovation Health.

In addition to the day’s speakers and panels, the event included case study breakouts during which Inova leaders presented functional scenarios currently facing the medical community. The sessions were designed to solicit feedback from attendees on how data analytics services and solutions can be applied to health care challenges, including actionable risk prediction, business models for digital health, and personalized medicine.