NVTC

NVTC University Technology Exhibition

February 24, 2011 - Presenting Universities


George Mason University

The George Washington University

University of Virginia

Virginia Commonwealth University

Virginia Tech


George Mason University

A Mixed Bag of Recent Research in GIS, Haptic Systems and Biodefense

Dr. Zoran Duric, associate professor for the Department of Computer Science at the GMU Volgenau School of Engineering, presented The Study and Simulation of Human Movement. During his presentation, Dr. Duric described research including a computer vision system to obtain segmental motion data, using computer vision to analyze human gait and using haptics to document functional movement in people with and without disabilities.

Dr. Fatah Kashanchi, professor and director of research at the GMU National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, presented about the ongoing and planned research related to the biological threat that comes from bacteria, viruses or toxins at the National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, the largest of 13 centers in the U.S.

Dr. Nigel Waters, professor for the GMU Department of Geography and GeoInformation Science. Dr. Waters presented a 10-minute overview of the ongoing research at Mason's Geographic Information Science Center, highlighting transportation GIS, web-based GIS, GIS and SDSS, GIS and sustainability, medical GIS, GIS, crime, media and democracy, and networks. The research included a study with Fairfax County Park Authority using GIS to select areas to protect.

Presentations


The George Washington University

Transformative Energy Technology Concepts at the Ashburn Virginia Science and Technology Campus

Dr. Stephen Hsu, director of The George Washington University Energy Institute, Virginia Science & Technology Campus at Ashburn, Va., shared some transformative energy technology concepts at the GWU Virginia and Science Technology Ashburn campus, including surface texturing and multi-layered texturing, and potentially self-healing technology for wind turbines. GWU has been conducting innovative research in engineering, physics and chemistry at its Virginia Science and Technology Campus since 1991.

Presentation


University of Virginia

The University of Virginia's Innovation and Research Agenda

Mark Crowell, executive director and associate vice president for innovation partnerships and commercialization at the University of Virginia, introduced the university, presenting the new innovation agenda at U.Va., sharing that one of the primary ways that U.Va. drives innovation is through its technology transfer.

Department Chair and Munster Professor of Systems and Information Engineering Dr. Barry Horowitz of the U.Va. School of Engineering and Applied Science continued the presentation, sharing the innovations developing at U.Va.'s Wireless Internet Center for Advanced Technology (WICAT) research site, including in the telemedicine field: working on a concept for ambulance real-time interaction with the emergency room, and in adaptive wireless surveillance systems, developing the military's unmanned vehicle surveillance systems.

Mary Lou Soffa, department chair and Owen. R. Cheatham professor of computer science at the U.Va. School of Engineering and Applied Science, closed the presentation, discussing research developing at the U.Va. Computer Science Department, including smart building technology to control HVAC systems with sensors as well as scanning three-dimensional objects to create 3-D graphics.

Presentations


Virginia Tech

Research Initiatives and Technology Transfer at Virginia Tech

The panel discussion, moderated by Dr. James Bohland, vice president and executive director of the Virginia Tech National Capital Region Operations, discussed research initiatives and technology transfer at Virginia Tech.

Dr. Charles Clancy, associate director for the Ted and Karyn Hume Center for National Security and Technology, discussed the local Virginia Tech Research Center in Arlington, Va. The center has five research clusters including national security, biomedical, decision analytics, energy and policy informatics. Dr. Clancy also discussed cybersecurity research at Virginia Tech, encompassing policy and law, software security, hardware security, network security and cyber modeling.

Dr. Thomas Campbell, associate director for outreach and research associate professor at the Virginia Tech Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), described the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research developing at Virginia Tech's ICTAS locations.

Dr. Stan Hefta, professor and biosystems program director at Virginia Tech's Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, described work being done at VBI across four major research divisions: cyber infrastructure, network modeling, systems biology, and medical informatics and systems.

Mark Coburn, president of Virginia Tech Intellectual Properties Inc. (VTIP), discussed technology transfer at VTIP, the commercialization arm at the university.

Presentation


Virginia Commonwealth University

Translational Research at Virginia Commonwealth University

Moderated by Dr. T. Allen Morris, assistant director of Virginia Commonwealth University Tech Transfer, four panelists described Translational Research at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Dr John Clore, professor and director at the VCU Center for Clinical and Translational Research presented VCU in the National Network of Academic Research Centers Moving Discoveries from Labs to Patients. Dr. Clore discussed the role of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research and the national Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) consortium in the promotion of clinical and translational research. With the $20 Million NIH CTSA received last year, VCU became the only academic health center in Virginia to join a national consortium of research centers.

Dr. B. Frank Gupton, professor and chair of the Department of Chemical & Life Science Engineering at VCU, presented Translational Research in VCU's Institute for Engineering and Medicine, introducing research at VCU's new Institute for Engineering and Medicine (IEM), including stem-cell engineering.

Dr. Krzysztof (Krys) Cios, professor and chair for the Department of Computer Science at VCU, presented Biologically-Inspired Computing and Cybersecurity Technologies at VCU, discussing efforts to translate the better understanding of how the human brain operates by neuroscientists into designing smarter algorithms and systems. As an example, Dr. Cios described a biologically-inspired face recognition system and also discussed VCU research in cybersecurity.

To close, Dr. Kenneth Kahn, professor for the Department of Marketing and Director of the da Vinci Center for Innovation, presented Innovation Through Interdisciplinary Collaboration: VCU's da Vinci Center, introducing VCU's da Vinci Center for Innovation, which is a collaboration of VCU's Schools of the Arts, Business and Engineering, which aims to catalyze innovation as it prepares students to enter a product innovation career and supports learning initiatives by partner organizations.

Presentations